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Keyman Community

People are at the heart of the Keyman Modern Turkish Studies Program. They bring expertise and experiences from a range of disciplines from across campus and around the world.

Program

İpek Yosmaoğlu

İpek Yosmaoğlu

Director of Keyman MTS, Associate Professor of History, Keyman MTS Faculty Board

i-yosmaoglu@northwestern.edu
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İpek Kocaömer Yosmaoğlu is the director of the Keyman Modern Turkish Studies Program and a historian of the late Ottoman Empire and early Republican Turkey. Prior to joining the History Department at Northwestern she taught at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and was a member of the Institute of Advanced Study in Princeton.
Gina Stec

Gina Stec

Program Coordinator

Phone number: 847-467-2359
gina.stec@northwestern.edu

Gina Stec is Program Coordinator for the Keyman Program, providing project management for outreach and communications, programming and operations. Previous experience at Northwestern includes roles within Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences, the Office of Equity and the Office of the Provost. She is currently pursuing her MA in Public Policy and Administration at Northwestern University.

 

Deniz Duruiz

Deniz Duruiz

Keyman Postdoctoral Fellow

deniz.duruiz@northwestern.edu
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Deniz Duruiz earned her PhD from Columbia University, Department of Anthropology. Her doctoral dissertation Dispossession, Racialization, and Rural Kurdish Labor Migration in Turkey concentrates on seasonal agricultural labor and similar low-paying rural labor practices in western Turkey, performed by over one million Kurdish and Arab migrant workers from the Kurdish region and Syrian refugees. Her work explores the connections between political violence, racialization, organization of capitalist production, and labor migration.

Keyman MTS Faculty Board

Seda Öğrenci-Memik

Seda Öğrenci-Memik

Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Department of Computer Science, Keyman MTS Faculty Board

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Seda Öğrenci-Memik is a Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE), and in the Department of Computer Science (CS). She is the Director of the Computer Engineering Division of ECE. She has received her PhD degree in Computer Science from the University of California-Los Angeles. She is the co-author of more than 115 peer reviewed publications and twelve patents on the subjects of Electronic Design Automation, Reconfigurable Computing, Thermal-Aware High Performance Computing, Computer Architecture, and Instrumentation for High Energy Physics. She is the author of the book: Heat Management in Integrated Circuits: On-chip and system-level monitoring and cooling (Materials, Circuits and Devices).

Wendy Pearlman

Wendy Pearlman

Associate Professor of Political Science, Keyman MTS Faculty Board

pearlman@northwestern.edu
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Wendy Pearlman is Associate Professor of Political Science at Northwestern University, where she specializes in Middle East politics. She is the author of four books, We Crossed A Bridge and It Trembled: Voices from Syria (HarperCollins, 2017), Violence, Nonviolence, and the Palestinian National Movement (Cambridge University Press, 2011) Occupied Voices: Stories of Everyday Life from the Second Intifada (Nation Books, 2003), and Triadic Coercion: Israel’s Targeting of States that Host Nonstate Actors (co-authored with Boaz Atzili, Columbia University Press,), as well as dozens of articles, essays, or book chapters. Wendy earned a Ph.D. from Harvard University, an MA from Georgetown University, and a BA from Brown University. She has conducted research in Spain, Germany, Lebanon, Jordan, Turkey, Israel, and the West Bank and Gaza Strip.

Özge Samancı

Özge Samancı

Associate Professor in the School of Communication, Keyman MTS Faculty Board

ozge@northwestern.edu
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Özge Samanci, media artist and graphic novelist, is an associate professor in Northwestern University’s School of Communication. Her interactive installations have been exhibited internationally, including Siggraph Art Gallery, FILE festival, Currents New Media, Piksel Festival for Electronic Arts, The Tech Museum of Innovation, WRO Media Art Biennial, Athens International Festival of Digital Arts and New Media, ISEA among others. Her autobiographical graphic novel Dare to Disappoint (Farrar Straus Giroux, 2015) received international press attention and has been translated into five languages. 

Elizabeth Shakman Hurd

Elizabeth Shakman Hurd

Professor of Political Science and Crown Chair in Middle East Studies, Keyman MTS Faculty Board

eshurd@northwestern.edu
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Elizabeth Shakman Hurd is Professor of Political Science and the Crown Chair in Middle East Studies at Northwestern University. Hurd was educated at Wesleyan University (B.A.), Yale University (M.A.), and The Johns Hopkins University (Ph.D). She has taught at Northwestern since 2002. Professor Hurd is known for her work on the politics of religion in U.S. foreign policy and international relations, and also studies relations between the United States and the Middle East, particularly Turkey and Iran. Hurd is the author of The Politics of Secularism in International Relations and Beyond Religious Freedom: The New Global Politics of Religion, both published by Princeton, and co-editor of Theologies of American Exceptionalism (forthcoming), Politics of Religious Freedom, and Comparative Secularisms in a Global Age. Hurd currently co-directs two collaborative projects: “Talking Religion: Publics, Politics, and the Media,” and “Contextualizing Radicalization: The Politics of Violent Extremism.” 
Shayna Silverstein

Shayna Silverstein

Assistant Professor of Performance Studies, Keyman MTS Faculty Board

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Shayna Silverstein is an assistant professor of Performance Studies at Northwestern University. Her research examines the politics and aesthetics of sound and movement in the contemporary Middle East, with a focus on Syria. Her recent publications include essays in Music & Politics, Remapping Sound Studies (Duke Press), Punk Ethnography (Wesleyan Press), Islam and Popular Culture (University of Texas Press), and an audiography in [in]Transition: Journal of Videographic Film & Moving Image. 

Lauren Stokes

Lauren Stokes

Assistant Professor of History, Keyman MTS Faculty Board

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Lauren Stokes (Ph.D., University of Chicago, 2016) is a historian of modern Germany, with a particular focus on migration and race in German history. She is currently at work on a book manuscript about “family reunification” for foreign workers in West Germany, one that explores the ways that regulation of the intimate sphere was linked to broader processes of labor migration, national identity formation, and European integration. She currently conducts research in German, Spanish, Italian, and Turkish.

 

Oya Topçuoğlu

Oya Topçuoğlu

Lecturer in the Middle East and North African Languages Program, Keyman MTS Faculty Board

oya.topcuoglu@northwestern.edu
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Oya Topçuoğlu is a Lecturer in the Middle East and North African Languages Program at Northwestern University. She holds a Ph.D. in the Art and Archaeology of the Ancient Near East from the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at the University of Chicago, and a BA in Ottoman History from Boğaziçi University in Istanbul. Dr. Topçuoğlu teaches on a range of subjects, including modern Turkish language and culture, and the history and archaeology of the Middle East. Dr. Topçuoğlu is an archaeologist by training, who specializes in the art, archaeology, and history of ancient Iraq, Syria, and Turkey. Her research addresses issues of social identity and cultural exchange, and the effects of political change and ideology on the material record of the ancient Middle East. 

Jessica Winegar

Jessica Winegar

Professor of Anthropology and Middle East and North African Studies, Keyman MTS Faculty Board

j-winegar@northwestern.edu
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Dr. Jessica Winegar is Professor of Anthropology and Middle East and North African Studies at Northwestern University. She is the author of numerous articles on visual culture and politics in the Middle East that have appeared in publications such as American Ethnologist, Cultural Anthropology, Anthropological Quarterly, Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication, Review of Middle East Studies, Critical Interventions, Contemporary Practices, Middle East Report, Jadaliyya and ArteEast. Her book Creative Reckonings:  The Politics of Art and Culture in Contemporary Egypt (Stanford, 2006), won the Albert Hourani award for best book in Middle East studies and the Arnold Rubin award for best book on African arts. She is also the co-author, with Lara Deeb, of Anthropology’s Politics: Discipline and Region through the Lens of the Middle East (Stanford, 2015). Dr. Winegar is the recipient of numerous grants for her research, including from the National Endowment for the Humanities, American Council of Learned Societies, Mellon Foundation, Social Science Research Council, and Fulbright.
Emrah Yıldız

Emrah Yıldız

Crown Junior Chair in Middle East Studies and Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Keyman MTS Faculty Board

eyildiz@northwestern.edu
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Emrah Yıldız is Crown Junior Chair in Middle East Studies and Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Northwestern University. He is a historically attuned cultural anthropologist, studying routes of religious, commercial and political mobility between Iran, Turkey and Syria. His research lies at the intersection of historiography and ethnography of borders and their states; anthropology of pilgrimage and visitation in Islam as well as the study of currencies and contraband commerce in political economy. The Wenner-Gren Foundation, Die Zeit Stiftung Bucerius Fellowship in Migration Studies, Cora Du Bois Charitable Trust, Harvard’s Center for Middle Eastern Studies and Northwestern’s Buffett Institute for Global Studies have supported his research and writing. A founding and former co-editor of Jadaliyya’s Turkey Page, Yıldız co-edited (with Anthony Alessandrini and Nazan Üstündag) the collection Resistance Everywhere:” The Gezi Protests and Dissident Visions of Turkey (2014).

Elizabeth Shakman Hurd

Elizabeth Shakman Hurd

Professor of Political Science and Crown Chair in Middle East Studies, Keyman MTS Faculty Board

eshurd@northwestern.edu
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Elizabeth Shakman Hurd is Professor of Political Science and the Crown Chair in Middle East Studies at Northwestern University. Hurd was educated at Wesleyan University (B.A.), Yale University (M.A.), and The Johns Hopkins University (Ph.D). She has taught at Northwestern since 2002. Professor Hurd is known for her work on the politics of religion in U.S. foreign policy and international relations, and also studies relations between the United States and the Middle East, particularly Turkey and Iran. Hurd is the author of The Politics of Secularism in International Relations and Beyond Religious Freedom: The New Global Politics of Religion, both published by Princeton, and co-editor of Theologies of American Exceptionalism (forthcoming), Politics of Religious Freedom, and Comparative Secularisms in a Global Age. Hurd currently co-directs two collaborative projects: “Talking Religion: Publics, Politics, and the Media,” and “Contextualizing Radicalization: The Politics of Violent Extremism.” 
Wendy Pearlman

Wendy Pearlman

Associate Professor of Political Science, Keyman MTS Faculty Board

pearlman@northwestern.edu
View Bio

Wendy Pearlman is Associate Professor of Political Science at Northwestern University, where she specializes in Middle East politics. She is the author of four books, We Crossed A Bridge and It Trembled: Voices from Syria (HarperCollins, 2017), Violence, Nonviolence, and the Palestinian National Movement (Cambridge University Press, 2011) Occupied Voices: Stories of Everyday Life from the Second Intifada (Nation Books, 2003), and Triadic Coercion: Israel’s Targeting of States that Host Nonstate Actors (co-authored with Boaz Atzili, Columbia University Press,), as well as dozens of articles, essays, or book chapters. Wendy earned a Ph.D. from Harvard University, an MA from Georgetown University, and a BA from Brown University. She has conducted research in Spain, Germany, Lebanon, Jordan, Turkey, Israel, and the West Bank and Gaza Strip.

Michael Rakowitz

Michael Rakowitz

Professor of Art Theory & Practice

m-rakowitz@northwestern.edu
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Michael Rakowitz is a conceptual artist whose work has appeared in venues worldwide including dOCUMENTA (13), P.S.1, MoMA, MassMOCA, Castello di Rivoli, the 16th Biennale of Sydney, the 10th and 14th Istanbul Biennials, Tate Modern in London, Lombard Freid Gallery in New York and Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago. 
Galya Ben-Arieh

Galya Ben-Arieh

Professor of Instruction in Political Science

galyab@northwestern.edu
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Galya Ben-Arieh's research centers on the rights and processes of refugee protection and the role of law in settlement and inclusion in host societies and comparative constitutional theory and transformation.
Özge Samancı

Özge Samancı

Associate Professor in the School of Communication, Keyman MTS Faculty Board

ozge@northwestern.edu
View Bio

Özge Samanci, media artist and graphic novelist, is an associate professor in Northwestern University’s School of Communication. Her interactive installations have been exhibited internationally, including Siggraph Art Gallery, FILE festival, Currents New Media, Piksel Festival for Electronic Arts, The Tech Museum of Innovation, WRO Media Art Biennial, Athens International Festival of Digital Arts and New Media, ISEA among others. Her autobiographical graphic novel Dare to Disappoint (Farrar Straus Giroux, 2015) received international press attention and has been translated into five languages. 

Oya Topçuoğlu

Oya Topçuoğlu

Lecturer in the Middle East and North African Languages Program, Keyman MTS Faculty Board

oya.topcuoglu@northwestern.edu
View Bio

Oya Topçuoğlu is a Lecturer in the Middle East and North African Languages Program at Northwestern University. She holds a Ph.D. in the Art and Archaeology of the Ancient Near East from the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at the University of Chicago, and a BA in Ottoman History from Boğaziçi University in Istanbul. Dr. Topçuoğlu teaches on a range of subjects, including modern Turkish language and culture, and the history and archaeology of the Middle East. Dr. Topçuoğlu is an archaeologist by training, who specializes in the art, archaeology, and history of ancient Iraq, Syria, and Turkey. Her research addresses issues of social identity and cultural exchange, and the effects of political change and ideology on the material record of the ancient Middle East. 

Jessica Winegar

Jessica Winegar

Professor of Anthropology and Middle East and North African Studies, Keyman MTS Faculty Board

j-winegar@northwestern.edu
View Bio

Dr. Jessica Winegar is Professor of Anthropology and Middle East and North African Studies at Northwestern University. She is the author of numerous articles on visual culture and politics in the Middle East that have appeared in publications such as American Ethnologist, Cultural Anthropology, Anthropological Quarterly, Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication, Review of Middle East Studies, Critical Interventions, Contemporary Practices, Middle East Report, Jadaliyya and ArteEast. Her book Creative Reckonings:  The Politics of Art and Culture in Contemporary Egypt (Stanford, 2006), won the Albert Hourani award for best book in Middle East studies and the Arnold Rubin award for best book on African arts. She is also the co-author, with Lara Deeb, of Anthropology’s Politics: Discipline and Region through the Lens of the Middle East (Stanford, 2015). Dr. Winegar is the recipient of numerous grants for her research, including from the National Endowment for the Humanities, American Council of Learned Societies, Mellon Foundation, Social Science Research Council, and Fulbright.
Emrah Yıldız

Emrah Yıldız

Crown Junior Chair in Middle East Studies and Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Keyman MTS Faculty Board

eyildiz@northwestern.edu
View Bio

Emrah Yıldız is Crown Junior Chair in Middle East Studies and Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Northwestern University. He is a historically attuned cultural anthropologist, studying routes of religious, commercial and political mobility between Iran, Turkey and Syria. His research lies at the intersection of historiography and ethnography of borders and their states; anthropology of pilgrimage and visitation in Islam as well as the study of currencies and contraband commerce in political economy. The Wenner-Gren Foundation, Die Zeit Stiftung Bucerius Fellowship in Migration Studies, Cora Du Bois Charitable Trust, Harvard’s Center for Middle Eastern Studies and Northwestern’s Buffett Institute for Global Studies have supported his research and writing. A founding and former co-editor of Jadaliyya’s Turkey Page, Yıldız co-edited (with Anthony Alessandrini and Nazan Üstündag) the collection Resistance Everywhere:” The Gezi Protests and Dissident Visions of Turkey (2014).

İpek Yosmaoğlu

İpek Yosmaoğlu

Director of Keyman MTS, Associate Professor of History, Keyman MTS Faculty Board

i-yosmaoglu@northwestern.edu
View Bio

İpek Kocaömer Yosmaoğlu is the director of the Keyman Modern Turkish Studies Program and a historian of the late Ottoman Empire and early Republican Turkey. Prior to joining the History Department at Northwestern she taught at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and was a member of the Institute of Advanced Study in Princeton.
Melike Arslan

Melike Arslan

Melike Arslan  I am a 5th year PhD Candidate in Sociology, a graduate student fellow at Comparative-Historical Social Sciences (CHSS) program and the Center for Legal Studies, and a member of the Global Capitalism and Law Research Group at Buffett Institute for Global Studies. My research investigates how the globally promoted laws on trade and finance transform the institutions and professions in the developing countries adopting these laws, and how these countries in return create more localized interpretations and implementations of these laws. I argue that this interaction between the global and the local systems of law is shaped by the international connections of legal implementers including judges, lawyers, prosecutors and inspectors, and I use various empirical methodologies, including comparative case study, statistics, text-as-data and interviews to examine this.

My previous research looked at the bankruptcy law reforms and the reorganization bankruptcy procedures in developing economies, and the transnational legal indicators (TLIs) used by the World Bank to influence these legal reforms. Currently, I am conducting my dissertation research on the antitrust laws (also called competition law) in Turkey and Mexico - two developing economies of similar size, both civil law countries and both under close pressure from their advance economy neighbors, the US and the EU, to adopt their legal institutions.

Arif Çamoğlu

Arif Çamoğlu

Arif Çamoğlu's research and writing focus on global romanticisms, political ontology, and comparative critique of imperial hegemonies. His dissertation investigates the aesthetic reconfigurations of empire within the intersecting literary and political histories of nineteenth century British and Ottoman empires. In his work, Camoglu traces the immaterial articulations of imperial sovereignty in British and Ottoman Turkish romanticisms, and considers their implications for the spectral return of empire in current global politics. His article "Inter-imperial Dimensions of Turkish Literary Modernity," recently published in MFS Modern Fiction Studies, illustrates some of the key concerns of his project such as the afterlives of empire in today's world as well as the continuities between national and imperial politics and aesthetics. 

Esra Çimencioğlu

Esra Çimencioğlu

Esra Çimencioğluis a Ph.D. candidate in Screen Cultures program with particular interests in transnational media, cinema of displacement, architectural theory, urban and postcolonial studies. Her dissertation focuses on the relationship between space, gender and everyday life in post-revolutionary Iranian cinema. After completing her undergraduate study in Urban and Regional Planning from Istanbul Technical University, she received an M.A. in Film and Television Studies from Istanbul Bilgi University with a thesis titled “Non-Places of New Turkish Cinema.” She has presented her work at the conferences including Society for Cinema and Media Studies, Association for the Study of the Middle East and Africa and Middle East History and Theory. She has been awarded a Fulbright Scholarship for her doctoral study in the United States. 
Şeyma Kabaoğlu

Şeyma Kabaoğlu

Şeyma Kabaoğluis a cultural anthropologist-in-training who works on everyday life of Islamic banking and finance in the Middle East, with a specific focus on participation banking industry in Turkey. Her broader research interests include alternative economies, government-financial market relations, religion, law and moralities of exchange. Besides finance, she has a passion for public archaeology. She has worked as an archival researcher for Market Street Chinatown Archaeological Project at Stanford University and volunteered at Kucukyali Arkeopark Project at Koc University in Istanbul as a public archaeologist. She is also interested in the processes of commodification of cultural heritage and cultural heritage management in general.” Seyma has a BS in Economics and a BA in Sociology from Boğaziçi University in Istanbul.
Özge Karagöz

Özge Karagöz

Özge Karagöz is a PhD student researching transnational histories of modern and contemporary art, with a focus on Turkey and the Middle East. Her research interests revolve around the historiography of art and the performativity of canonical art historical narratives in relation to the formation of art historical subjectivities, particularly in contexts outside of western Europe and North America. She received a B.A. in Visual Arts from Sabancı University in Istanbul and an M.A. in Visual and Critical Studies from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where she wrote a thesis on the genealogy of some major art terms in the Turkish language, tracing their complex semantic histories in relation to the Arabo-Persian, French, German, and Anglophone art discourses as well as Turkey's intellectual history. She is also a Mellon Cluster Fellow in Northwestern’s Middle East and North African Studies.
Rana B. Khoury

Rana B. Khoury

Rana B. Khoury is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Political Science. She studies comparative politics with a focus on civil war, state-society relations, and refugee politics in the Middle East.
Hazal Özdemir

Hazal Özdemir

Hazal Özdemir is a second-year doctoral student in History and a fellow in the Middle East and North African Studies cluster. Before coming to Northwestern, she received a BA in History from Boğaziçi University, Turkey and an MA in History of Art with Photography from Birkbeck, University of London. She specializes in the Ottoman Empire in the late 19th and early 20th century, with an emphasis on Armenian labor migration. Her interest in photography led her to work on official migration photographs of Armenians who were immigrating to the US from the Ottoman Empire. She wants to explore the experience of women and children during migration, the issue of class and the cultural implications of the economic rivalry emerging from migration. Hazal is also interested in how Armenians perceived the issues of abandoning homeland, renouncing their Ottoman subjecthood, becoming landless and adjusting to their new lives in the US.

Areas of interest: emigration to the US, photography as a means of state control, Ottoman photography, Ottoman migration policies, Ottoman Armenians, subjecthood, denaturalization

Aydın Özipek

Aydın Özipek

Aydın Özipek My dissertation research is an ethnographic study of Turkish state's youth culturing agenda under AKP governments led by Recep Tayyip Erdogan. For two years of ethnographic engagement in a multi-sited research in Istanbul, I explored how culture workers blended promises of upward class mobility and political certainty with notions of cultural authenticity and refinement in their attempts to appeal to variously-positioned young people. At stake in these encounters were intergenerational negotiations over personal and collective identity, public piety, traditional and youthful aesthetics, and political agency. By following young people’s trajectories over extended periods, I observed that the AKP’s youth culturing agenda, as a form of anticipatory politics that relies heavily on neo-Ottomanism, turns intense present uncertainty into a means of governmental control by simultaneously cultivating transformative agency in youth yet constantly deferring it to an undefined future. This research follows from my long-held interest in questions of politics of youth and temporality, class mobility, ethics and aesthetics of cultural production, and popular and political Islam. Previously, I studied emergent forms of cultural expression among lower-class youth in Istanbul as part of my MA in Cultural Studies at Sabanci University (2013); and the Gulenist youth for my first MA in Sociology and Social Anthropology at Central European University (2009).    
İdil Özkan

İdil Özkan

İdil Özkan is a doctoral student in linguistic anthropology at Northwestern University. Her dissertation project investigates the 2015 citizenship offer of Spain to Sephardic Jews, exploring language ideologies, citizenship, transnational migration, and the understandings of homeland and belonging among Turkish Sephardic Jews. Idil has a BA in sociology from Boğazici University, and an MA in Cultural Studies from Istanbul Bilgi University, Turkey. Her MA thesis dealt with the temporal politics and affect of language loss among Turkish Jews. She worked as a teaching assistant at the Department of Sociology at Istanbul Bilgi University between 2014-17. As co-founder of YATOÇ (the Study Group on Jewish Communities) in Istanbul Bilgi University, she organized a number of roundtables and academic workshops on Jewish Studies in Turkey.

Keyman Visiting Professors

Kerem Öktem is the 2019-2020 Keyman Visiting Professor at the Keyman Modern Turkish Studies Program at the Buffett Institute and the Department of Politics at Northwestern University. Since 2014, he has held the chair of Southeast European Studies and Modern Turkey at the University of Graz. He is an associate of the Centre of International Studies at the University of Oxford, where he completed his PhD in Political Geography in 2006 and his M St. in Modern Middle Eastern Studies in 2001. Dr Öktem is an alumni of the Mercator – IPC Fellowship in Turkish Studies and a collaborator of the Mercator foundation in Germany. His research interests include the politics and society of modern Turkey with a particular focus on social movements, minorities, diasporas, and queer rights. He has published several collective volumes and monographs, including Turkey’s Exit from Democracy. Illiberal governance in Turkey and beyond (London & New York: Routledge, 2018); Die Tuerkei im Spannungsfeld von Kollektivismus und Diversitaet (Wiesbaden: Springer, 2016); World War I and the End of the Ottomans. From the Balkan War to the Armenian Genocide (London: I.B. Tauris, 2015); 
Another empire?  A decade of Turkey’s foreign policy under the Justice and Development Party (Istanbul: Bilgi University Press (2012); Angry Nation. Turkey since 1989 (London: Zed Books, 2011); Turkey’s Engagement with Modernity. Conflict and Change in the 20th Century (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009); In the long shadow of Europe: Greeks and Turks in the era of Post-Nationalism (Leiden: Brill, 2009).

Ioannis N. Grigoriadis

Ioannis N. Grigoriadis

2018-19

Ioannis N. Grigoriadis is the invited 2018-2019 Keyman Visiting Professor. Ioannis N. Grigoriadis an associate professor and the Jean Monnet Chair of European Studies at the Department of Political Science and Public Administration, Bilkent University. He was recently an IPC-Stiftung Mercator Senior Research Fellow at the German Institute for International and Security Affairs (Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik-SWP) in Berlin and a Stanley J. Seeger Research Fellow at Princeton University. His research interests include late Ottoman and republican Turkish politics and history with a focus on nationalism and democratization. He has published the following books in English: Democratic Transition and the Rise of Populist Majoritarianism: Constitutional Reform in Greece and Turkey (London & New York: Palgrave Springer, 2017), Instilling Religion in Greek and Turkish Nationalism: A “Sacred Synthesis”, (London & New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012), Trials of Europeanization: Turkish Political Culture and the European Union, (London & New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009). 

Leyla Neyzi

Leyla Neyzi

2017–18

Leyla Neyzi (PhD, Cornell University, 1991) is based at Sabanci University in Istanbul. Her areas of interest include oral history, memory studies, European and Middle Eastern ethnography, nationalism and minorities, transnational youth and social movements.

Başak Yavçan

Başak Yavçan

2015–16

Başak Yavçan is an Assistant Professor in the Political Science Department at TOBB University of Economics and Technology in Turkey. She received her Ph.D. from University of Pittsburgh with a focus on comparative politics and international relations and worked as a visiting researcher at New York University. She specializes in comparative political behavior, specifically intergroup relations in the forms of public opinion toward immigration and the European Union (E.U.) and comparative immigrant acculturation attitudes. Her current research focuses on the intergroup dynamics resulting from the mass influx of Syrian refugees in Turkey, with an emphasis on the societal and political attitudes of Syrian displaced people.

Murat Arsel

Murat Arsel

2014–15

Murat Arsel is a broadly trained human geographer, specialized in the political economy of environmental change and societal transformation, paying particular attention to natural resource conflicts, rural and agrarian development, and state-society relationships. Much of his empirical has focused on Turkey, with developing interests in (Western) China and Latin America (particularly Ecuador). He received his PhD from Cambridge in the Environment, Society and Development research cluster of the Department of Geography. He also has an MPhil in Environment and Development from Cambridge, an MSc in Politics of the World Economy from the London School of Economics, and a BA in Economics and Government from Clark University. Before taking up his current position at the ISS in Netherlands, he was based at the University of Chicago as a Lecturer and Research Associate in Environmental Studies. He is currently a member of the editorial board of the interdisciplinary development studies journal Development and Change.

Soli Özel

Soli Özel

2013–14

Soli Özel is a professor of international relations and political science at Istanbul Kadir Has University. He is currently Fisher Family Fellow at the Kennedy School of Government of Harvard University. Professor Ozel received his B.A. at Bennington College, M.A. from Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), and Ph.D. in political science from the University of California, Berkeley. Ozel taught at U.C. Santa Cruz, SAIS, University of Washington, Hebrew University, and Bogazici University in Istanbul. He was a fellow at St. Antony's College at Oxford in the spring of 2002, and he was a senior visiting fellow at the European Union Institute for Security Studies in the fall of the same year. Ozel's articles and opinion pieces appear in a wide variety of leading newspapers in Turkey and elsewhere around the world. Currently, he is a columnist for Haberturk newspaper, a frequent contributor to The Washington Post's "Post Global", and the former editor of the Turkish edition of Foreign Policy. Most recently, he co-authored the report Rebuilding a Partnership: Turkish- American Relations For a New Era? with Dr. Suhnaz Yilmaz and Abdullah Akyuz.

Meltem Ahiska

Meltem Ahiska

2012–13

Meltem Ahiska is associate professor of sociology at Boğaziçi University, Istanbul. Her current research is on the emergence of Turkey as a nation-state in particular, and the nature of modernity in general. Her earlier research addresses the forms of communication developed by the Turkish governing elite in the first half of the twentieth century to “Westernize” the country and to create a national community where in fact none existed. She has published a book of poems, Havalandırma ,and co-curated exhibitions. In addition to her many articles, essays, and poems, she is the author most recently of Occidentalism in Turkey: Questions of Modernity and National Identity in Turkish Radio Broadcasting.
Cem Behar

Cem Behar

2011–12

Cem Behar (2011) is a Professor of Economics and Vice-President in charge of Academic Affairs at Boðaziçi University, Istanbul, Turkey. He has a double scholarly identity: his publications on late Ottoman social and family history include Istanbul Households, Marriage, Family and Fertility 1880–1940 (Cambridge, 1991). As a musicologist and historian of Ottoman music he has authored many scholarly publications: Ali Ufkî ve Mezmurlar (Istanbul, 1990), Zaman, Mekân, Müzik – Klasik Türk Musikisinde Eðitim (Meþk), Ýcra ve Aktarým (Istanbul, 1993) and Aþk olmayýnca meþk olmaz (Istanbul, 2003). He will teach two courses in spring 2011: Cities and Societies in the Middle East (WCAS) and a seminar on non-Western Musical traditions (Bienen School of Music), with a particular focus on Turkey and the Middle East.

Şule Kut

Şule Kut

2010–11

Şule Kut (2010) is dean of the Faculty of Economics and Administrative Sciences in Istanbul Bilgi University. Her teaching and research interests include foreign policy analysis, Turkish foreign policy with emphasis on the Balkans, the Caucasus and Central Asia, Turkish-EU and Turkish-U.S. relations as well as Balkan politics. She is the author of four books and more than thirty articles in English and Turkish. Kut is the president of the Turkish Political Science Association and an elected member of the Executive Committee of the International Political Science Association. She received her MA and PhD in political science from the State University of New York in Binghamton. Kut is teaching a course on Turkish Politics and a course on Turkish Foreign Policy in the winter quarter. She gave the talk What is So New About “New Turkish Foreign Policy”? at the Faculty & Fellows Colloquium.

Sibel Bozdoğan

Sibel Bozdoğan

2009–10

Sibel Bozdoğan has taught architectural history and theory courses at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, MIT, and Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design. She has served as the director of liberal studies at the Boston Architectural Center and teaches in the Graduate Architecture Program of Bilgi University in Istanbul. Her interests range from cross-cultural histories of modern architecture in Europe, the United States, the Mediterranean and the Middle East to critical investigations of technology, modernity and national identity as they have informed the culture and production of architecture in Turkey and across the globe. She has published articles on these topics, co-authored a monograph on Turkish architect Sedad Hakki Eldem, and co-edited an interdisciplinary volume, Rethinking Modernity and National Identity in Turkey. Her Modernism and Nation Building: Turkish Archi­tectural Culture in the Early Republic (University of Washington Press) won the 2002 Alice Davis Hitchcock Award of the Society of Architectural Historians and the Koprulu Book Prize of the Turkish Studies Association. Bozdoğan taught two courses at Northwestern, a lecture course on “Modern Architecture and National Identity: Ottoman/Turkish Case in Global Context” and a seminar on “Istanbul: From Imperial Capital to Global City.” She also presented at a Buffett Institute Faculty & Fellows Colloquium; her talk was titled Urban Landscapes of Global Modernity in Istanbul.

Şevket Pamuk

Şevket Pamuk

2008–09

Şevket Pamuk (2008) is one of the most prominent historians of Ottoman and Turkish economic history. He is a professor of economics and economic history at the Ataturk Institute for Modern Turkish History, which is part of Bogaziçi University in Istanbul, Turkey. His publications in English include: Ottoman Empire and European Capitalism, 1820-1913: Trade, Investment, and Production (1987); History of Middle East Economies in the Twentieth Century (1998); Mediterranean Response to Globalization before 1950 (2000), co-edited with Jeffrey G. Williamson; and Monetary History of the Ottoman Empire (2000). Professor Pamuk’s two courses at Northwestern were “Turkey and Modernity,” offered through the Department of History, and “Economic History of the Middle East Since 1800,” offered by the Department of Economics. His presentation at the Buffett Institute Faculty and Fellows Colloquium was Export Oriented New Industrial Centers across Anatolia.

Yeşim Burul Seven

2007–08

Yeşim Burul Seven (2007) served as an adjunct professor of media and communications at Istanbul Bilgi University, Turkey, where she taught cultural studies, film studies and mass communication theories. Her research defines and analyses the new cultural space created by young filmmakers, musicians and authors of Turkish origin in Germany. Additional research interests include the formation and representation of cultural identities and popular music studies. She is a founding member of NECS, the European Network for Cinema and Media Studies. She has published articles on Turkish-German cinema, migrant filmmakers & musicians and Turkish popular culture. She has also been a film critic and radio producer/presenter in Istanbul, writing for monthly film magazines and producing the weekly radio show “Sinefil” at Açk Radyo (Open Radio). Seven taught two courses during spring 2007: “Identities in Turkish Film and Television” and “Turkish Cinema.” She also presented her work on Turkish cinema at a Buffett Institute Faculty & Fellows Colloquium.

Haldun Gülalp

2006–07

Haldun Gülalp , the inaugural Keyman Visiting Professor, was professor of sociology at Bogaziçi University in Istanbul. He holds a PhD in economics from the University of Ankara and a PhD in sociology from the State University of New York at Binghamton. He has written a large number of books and articles in both Turkish and English, including Kimlikler Siyaseti: Türkiye'de Siyasal İslamın Temelleri (Politics of Identities: Foundations of Political Islam in Turkey). He taught two courses in spring 2006. The first, “Islam and Secularism: Iran and Turkey,” was team-taught with Fariba Zarinebaf in the Department of History. The other course, cross-listed between sociology and political science, was called “Religion and Nationalism.” In 2007, Haldun Gülalp became the Director of the Center for Global Studies at the Yıldız Technical University in Istanbul.

Ahmet Evin

2005–06

Ahmet Evin (2005), the founding dean of Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at Sabanci University, received his BA in English and Comparative Literature in 1966 and his PhD in Middle East Studies and Cultural History in 1973 from Columbia University. Prior to his appointment at Sabanci University, he taught at New York University, Harvard University, Hacettepe University (Ankara), University of Pennsylvania (where he also served as director of the Middle East Center), University of Hamburg, and Bilkent University in Ankara (where he headed the Department of Political Science). As director of education of the Aga Khan Trust for Culture, a Geneva-based international development foundation, he coordinated the program for Islamic Architecture at Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and assisted in the development of architectural education in Asia and Africa. With the European Commission's support, Evin initiated a policy dialogue on the future of European architecture, EU's eastward expansion, its Mediterranean policy, and the customs union agreement with Turkey. He currently works on current foreign policy issues related to the European enlargement, its significance for Turkey and the region as well as its effect on Transatlantic relations.

Keyman Visiting Scholars

Onur Dirlik

Onur Dirlik 

Keyman Visiting Scholar 2018-19

Onur Dirlik is an assistant professor of management at Eskişehir Osmangazi University Business School. His research focuses on institutional change, Turkish business systems and varieties of capitalism. Currently, he is interested in how context-specific institutions differentiate organizational forms; how global, regional, national, and local influences affect organizations; and the power of the state in shaping the market. Onur Dirlik received his PhD in Economics and Administrative Sciences from Akdeniz University, and he served as a Visiting Research Scholar at the University Viadrina Frankfurt (Oder), Business School.

Sevda Alankuş

Sevda Alankuş

Keyman Visiting Scholar, 2017-18

Sevda Alankuş is a graduate of Faculty of Political Science, Ankara University, and holds degrees in Political Science (Ph.D.) and in Communication Studies (Professorship). Her recent research covers issues of feminist media criticism, alternative media and news reporting. She published the Peace Journalism Handbook (2017) and was the editor of a journalism handbook series that included the Human, Women, Children’s Right-based Journalism (2007, 2012). Her co-authored works focus on Turkish series in the global media market, discourse analysis of Turkish Cypriot media from a peace journalism point of view and textual analysis of nationalist Turkish Cypriot narrations. Alankuş is currently teaching at the Department of New Media, Kadir Has University, Istanbul.

Senem Aslan

Senem Aslan

Keyman Visiting Scholar, 2017-18

Senem Aslan is an Associate Professor of Political Science at Bates College. Her book Nation-Building in Turkey and Morocco: Governing Kurdish and Berber Dissent was published by Cambridge University Press in 2014. She teaches courses on Middle East politics, state-building, and nationalism. She was a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University between 2008 and 2010. She has published articles in the International Journal of Middle East Studies, Nationalism and Ethnic Politics, and the European Journal of Turkish Studies. Her recent research focuses on the politics of symbolism and imagery in Turkey.

Senem Yildirim-Ozdem

Senem Yildirim-Ozdem

Keyman Visiting Scholar, 2017-18

Senem Yildirim-Ozdem is an assistant professor of political science and public administration at Antalya AKEV University, Turkey. Her research mainly focuses on the public-private divide in contemporary political theory, the gendered nature of this dichotomy, and the concepts of social, political, and civil society. Her publications have appeared in journals such as British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies (2017), Theory in Action (2016), The European Legacy: Toward New Paradigms (2014) and Southeast European and Black Sea Studies (2011). She received her doctorate in political science in 2011 from Turkey’s Bilkent University, where she also completed her undergraduate degree. She was previously a visiting researcher at UIC.

Hüseyin Levent Köker

Hüseyin Levent Köker

Keyman Visiting Scholar, 2017-18

Hüseyin Levent Köker is a graduate of Ankara Law School and holds a PhD in political science. He was previously Hans Speier Visiting Professor in the New School for Social Research. Currently working on a critical re-interpretation of constitutional politics in Turkey, Köker’s research interests include constitution-making and post-national constitutionalism, democratic political theory, secularism, nationalism, multiculturalism, and cosmopolitanism. His publications include Modernization, Kemalism and Democracy (2009), Two Different Conceptions of Politics (2008), and Democracy, Critique, and Turkey (2008). Some of his articles have been published in Political Theory, The Annals of the AAPSS, and Constellations.

Fatih Turkmenoglu

Fatih Turkmenoglu

Keyman Program Visiting Scholar, 2014-15

Fatih Turkmenoglu is a well-known human interest journalist and TV host in Turkey. After completing a certificate program at NYU, he started working for newspapers and magazines in Istanbul. His television career started in 1996, reporting for CNN International from Turkey and hosting a widely followed travel show on CNN TURK for more than 10 years. He is a Knight-Wallace Journalism Fellowship alumnus and has produced and hosted more than 1,000 television shows, traveled to over 80 countries, written three books and co-authored a travel book.

Sule Kut, Visiting Scholar

Keyman Program Visiting Scholar, 2009-10

Şule Kut is rector of Okan University in Istanbul, Turkey. Her teaching and research interests include foreign policy analysis, Turkish foreign policy with emphasis on the Balkans, the Caucasus and Central Asia, Turkish-EU and Turkish-U.S. relations, and Balkan politics. When Kut visited Northwestern, she was serving as dean of the Faculty of Economics and Administrative Sciences at Istanbul Bilgi University. Kut is the president of the Turkish Political Science Association and was formerly an elected member of the Executive Committee of the International Political Science Association.